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The People of the Perm Krai

Русские, село Ключи / Russians
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Русские, село Ключи / Russians

Русские, село Ключи, Красноуфимский уезд Пермской губернии, начало XX века

Russians, Kluchi village, Krasnoufimsky uyezd Perm province, Early 20th century

The Perm Krai is a unique ethnocultural space with many centuries of history, and distinguished in part by its polyethnicity. Over time, the region was settled by people from several different parts of the world, each with their own languages and economic and cultural traditions.
The modern ethnocultural layout of the region first took form in the 15th and 16th centuries.
The ethnic traditions of ancient communities remain evident today, their traces found in modern cultural traditions and in the numerous archaeological monuments they left behind.
The Perm Krai is sometimes also called the Prikamye, which translates as ‘the area along the Kama River’.
 

The ancestors of the Komi people originally inhabited the upper Kama River, while the north-east Prikamye was the territory of the Mansi, and the south was inhabited by the ancestors of the modern-day Tatar and Bashkir.
Russians, who eventually became the dominant population, began appearing in the 16th century. Groups of Mari and Udmurts arrived in the 17th century. Seven different peoples have traditionally made their home in Prikamye: Russians, Komi-Permyaks, Udmurts, Mari, Mansi, Tatars and Bashkirs.
The ethnocultural diversity of the Prikamye is made up of three cultural traditions. The Finno-Ugric group consists of the Komi-Permyaks, the Udmurts, the Mari, and the Mansi. The Turkic group includes the Tatars and the Bashkirs. The Slavic group is represented by Russian culture.
 

Коми-пермяки, Чердынский уезд / Komi-Permians
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Коми-пермяки, Чердынский уезд / Komi-Permians

Коми-пермяки, Чердынский уезд Пермской губернии, начало XX века

Komi-Permians, Cherdynsky uyezd Perm province, Early 20th century

The Komi-Permyaks, the Mari, the Mansi and the Udmurts all belong to the Finno-Ugric branch of the Ural linguistic community. The Komi-Permyaks settled in what were then called the Cherdynsky and Solikamsky uyezds in the Perm guberniia . Now they live in five districts of the Komi-Permyak region. The Udmurt villages were originally in the Osinsky uyezd, while now they live predominantly in the Kuedinsky district. The Mari lived in the Kungursky and Krasnoufimsky uyezds, and now live in Suksunsky, Kishertsky, Chernushinsky and Oktyabrsky districts. The Mansi of the Cherdynsky uyezd resided on the upper stretches of the Vishera River. In 2002, there was a mass migration into the area, when 103.5 thousand Komi-Permyaks, 5.2 thousand Mari, 26.3 thousand Udmurts and 31 Mansi settled in Perm Krai.  

Татары, город Кунгур / Tatars
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Татары, город Кунгур / Tatars

Татары, город Кунгур Пермской губернии, начало XX века

Tatars, Kungur Perm province, Early 20th century

Turkic peoples settled in the Krai in the southern Osinsky, Kungursky, Permsky and Krasnoufimsky uyezds. At present, Turkic peoples live in 12 districts of the Krai. In 2002, their population included 136.6 thousand Tatars and 40.7 thousand Bashkirs.
The main ethnic culture in the region is Russian. This is not only due to the fact that the Russians make up more than 85% of the population of Perm Krai and live in all administrative districts, but also due to the influence Russian culture has on the other cultures found in the Prikamye region.
 

The set of postcards which you now hold in your hands is a collection of images of unique peoples and cultures, images of the past made accessible today in museums. These pictures give us an opportunity to examine our history and to become acquainted with the past.

Обложка набора открыток
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Обложка набора открыток

Обложка набора открыток Народы Пермского края 

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Uyezd is an administrative term that is no longer used in modern Russia. The Soviets replaced the uyezd with raions or ‘districts’, a term which remains in use today. Guberniia, which is here translated as ‘province’, is another outdated administrative term. It, too, was replaced by the Soviets following the revolution in 1917. ("Administrative territorial division of Russia in the 18th-20th centuries" («Административно-территориальное деление России XVIII—XX веков») "Otechestvennye Zapiski", No.6, 2002), as cited on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Uyezd and http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Guberniya. 

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